Grades 1-5 Art

Category: PYP Key Concept: Perspective (Page 1 of 3)

Third Grade: How We Express Ourselves (Transdisciplinary Unit)

“Fish printing is called Gyotaku. In Japan, fishermen used to make a print of the fish they caught to save a memory of that fish. These days, it is an art. If you want to make a fish print, you take an ink roller and then you take a plastic printing plate. You roll the ink on the plate with the ink roller and then take your fish, put it on the ink, and then you stamp on paper. After that you can take a liner or black pen to add small details to the fish.”

By Dima 3CB

“This is Buchae from Korea. It is used for traditional dance in Korea. It is a really famous dance in Korea. I was inspired to create it because it is so beautiful. First I used stiff paper. Then I painted it. I painted white feathers with pink paint and stuck them to the fan. It painted really well. It was challenging to paint the fan because I first painted the roses, and the leaves and then I made the background, so I had to paint the leaves again”.

By Liza 3CK

Third Grade students have been involved in a Transdisciplinary Unit: How We Express Ourselves. This means that both in their classroom Unit of Inquiry, and in art, we address the same Central Idea :Through examining the arts, people can gain insights into culture”, while keeping in mind, the Key and Related Concepts of Perspective, Connection and Communication. In art, we have addressed questions such as “How is art an expression of culture? What is symbolism? How can art communicate personal stories, values and beliefs?”

This unit provides us the perfect opportunity to address both the ‘Creating, and Responding” Standards, from the National Core Art Curriculum Standards. Students are required to speculate about processes an artist uses to create a work of art, determine messages communicated by an image, and interpret art by analysing use of media to create subject matter.

Our most important objective, is that we are able to maintain opportunity for student agency and choice, as a means of ensuring optimal engagement for all.

In art class, the unit was launched before December break. Students were introduced to art works and designs found in Australian Aboriginal Dot Paintings, New Zealand Maori tattoos, wood carvings and jewellery, Mexican Huichol Yarn Paintings and Ancient Egyptian Wall Paintings. As a whole class students analysed and critiqued examples of these, taking note of repeating shapes, patterns and imagery, and sought meaning. What could they tell us about the location of the artists? What do we already know about these locations, or people, or cultures? What could repeating motifs/symbols tell us about what is important to this culture – beliefs, values and lifestyles?

Students discovered these through observational drawing. Provided with many examples, students were offered choices to investigate those which appealed to them most, through a variety of drawing and painting tools.

During this investigational time, students identified the location of the peoples/cultures on the world map, listened to some stories, music, viewed some dance videos, and delved a little deeper into symbolism in Australian Aboriginal Dot Paintings, working on making connections with all of the above.

Our work before December break was a good introduction to how art can address the concepts of perspective, communication and connection. Meanwhile, in their home room class, students were beginning to identify a culture for their own personal study.

In their homeroom class, students learned to research a culture of interest to them. A summative task was set, for students to demonstrate their understanding of the Central Idea, through a presentation, which incorporated an example of one of the arts from the chosen culture. Students were allowed to choose visual, or a performing art (eg music, dance, drama).

Those who made a strong connection to a visual art, were provided up to three art classes to work on their art piece. Additional time was given, for students to use our ‘action station’ (art area outside the art room) at a time agreed with their home room teacher.

With this, students were able to demonstrate their ability to plan an art work, make decisions on materials and tools they need, set up, and be responsible for, their workspace, and independently manage their time.

It was fabulous to see so many Third Graders choosing visual art as their art form and independently taking responsibility for their own learning. We saw the creation of art works from a variety of cultures, in a wide range of media.

Herewith, a small gallery of some finished products, and a video of our awesome artists in action. Enjoy!

Third Grade: Artists Observe

For the past three lessons, Third Grade students have been involved in investigations to kick start the Transdisciplinary Unit ‘How We Express Ourselves‘, which involves connecting with the same Central Idea, currently, or soon to be, the focus of their Classroom Unit of Inquiry: “Through examining the arts, people can gain insights into culture“. In art, we follow the Line of Inquiry “Art is representation of time, place and culture, and understanding symbolism helps us gain a sense of the artist’s perspective

Both in class and in the art studio, emphasis is placed on the concepts of Perspective, Communication and Connection, and the ‘Approach to Learning‘: Research.

The past three lessons could be seen as ‘small tasters’ of culture through art. Students have been exposed to a variety of art, by which an interpretation of symbols, can inform us of the location of the artist, climate, environment, values and beliefs. They have been ‘Responding‘ to art works through discussion of what we already know, personal interpretation, artist and viewer’s perspective.

Students have been exposed to Cave art, Australian Aboriginal Dot Painting, Huichol Yarn Painting, Ancient Egyptian Wall Painting, and Maori Design. For now, we simply observe. Which elements of art and principles of design are found in these works? Where do we find repetition, and of what? What could this mean, or communicate about the life of these artists? These are simply questions for now, as AAS artists investigate/research, through observation. AAS artists have had choices in the media they work with, and to focus on the style of art which interests them most. Whilst working, they have watched music and dance videos, and located the art on a world map.

In the new year, students will choose a culture of personal interest, to research in their classroom. They will be allowed to use the art studio to plan and create art of their choice, to support their classroom Unit of Inquiry. For those who do not choose to use the art studio to directly connect with their class work, there will be more of a guided inquiry into symbolism in art.

 

Fourth Grade: Composition & Photography

As we enjoy our last few lessons of the year, Fourth Grade have been taking advantage of the gorgeous weather by working on some photography in the courtyard. Addressing the Central Idea ‘Artists use personal experiences to represent time, place (and culture) that connects an audience’ and focusing on a Line of Inquiry involving the connection between personal experience and creating art, students have selected themes, to create a ‘photographic collection’ of their own (presented as a slideshow in Seesaw). Themes such as texture, color, pattern, emphasis (overall knowledge/ understanding of composition) and the concept of perspective have been taken into consideration. With this, students have had great fun, using their iPads to edit photos. Exploring and discovering possibilities, they have cropped, adjusted color, light/dark, saturation, and so on. Please enjoy this gallery of work from our amazing Fourth Grade Photographers.

Fourth Grade: Who We Are and Mask Making

(This post contains a link to a Student Seesaw Post and a Youtube Video. In order to listen to/watch the post, it may be better to view from a PC or Laptop)

For the second time this year, Fourth Grade are involved in a Transdisciplinary Unit. This means that in art we are addressing the same theme and concept, which they have previously, in class. The PYP Unit of Inquiry was, and is in Art now, ‘Who We Are’. The PYP Transdisciplinary Theme of ‘Who We Are’ addresses questions about culture, beliefs and values. Following on from their home classroom UOI, students are continuing to develop an understanding of the Central Idea: Beliefs and Values contribute to identity and an understanding of diversity, with the key concept of Perspective (What are the points of view? Different ways of looking, interpretation and understanding).

In art class, we are approaching our own Line of Inquiry: People of all cultures use creativity to tell stories about their beliefs and values. 

Tuning in to a Mask Making Unit

(Image borrowed from mapio.net)

There is nothing better than a primary source to spur curiosity and generate questions. Students have tuned into the central idea, concepts and line of inquiry by observing two masks originating from the island of Bali, Indonesia, and using a secondary source (Youtube) to gain a sense of the masks in action, and the sounds of Gamelan and environment surrounding them. With much excitement, many questions arose, around who they are, where they are from, what are they for, how were they made? Students have been exposed to the story of Barong and Rangda at a very basic level (as to some they may appear frightening!), concluding that they portray the Hindu belief/value in balance. With the knowledge that one character is good, and one evil, students practiced their Thinking Skills by observing and describing the visual characteristics of the mask, paying close attention to the craftsmanship, and point of view as an artist: “how did the artist use the elements of art and principles of design to express the character of these mythical characters?” In addition to this, they have been exposed to images of masks from a variety of other cultures for critique and analysis. Selecting one by choice, students should have uploaded their thoughts to Seesaw. Please click on the link below for examples by Emily 4MA and Laura 4BE.

Ivan 4MS Analysis of Indonesian Mask Rangda

Laura 4BE Analysis of Venetian Mask

The Creative Process – Developing Skills & Create

Usually, we would spend time, planning for a mask of our own (designing), and one which may express our own values/beliefs. However, as this was a focus of our last unit (many lessons were spent generating ideas for a painting) this trimester we have skipped directly to developing skills and creating, as we do need the extra time for ‘making’. So, this time, students are diving in! This is  spontaneous creativity! Most have ideas in their minds, but have not been required to share this yet (Reflection/Evaluation to come later). During this part of the process, students are developing skills by changing the shape and building on a basic form by use of cut out cardboard pieces, and the creation of 2D and 3D shapes, to add to the original form using a variety of attachment techniques (This is not easy). Good organisational skills have also been the key to success.

Having created a strong foundation, they have been learning to use paper and paste to form one piece. Again, very challenging for many, and a lot of  fun, for all. The focus so far, has been on the art elements of shape and form. Watch this space for the introduction of color.

 

Fifth Grade: Artists as Change Makers

(Videos in this post may be easier to view from a laptop or PC)

Transdisciplinary Theme: How We Express Ourselves, PYP Key Concept: Perspective

Central Idea: Collaborative Inquiry is a journey which empowers students to demonstrate life-long skills and dispositions which lead to action.

Line of Inquiry: Artists work together use creativity to raise awareness of matters that are important to them.

Note: Our line of Inquiry strives to place emphasis on three things: Collaboration, Change Makers, Global Issues & Citizenship.

Welcome back! This is going to be a long blog post (student video at end of this post). My aim is to enlighten you, as best possible regards this year’s strong integration of art and the upcoming Grade 5 PYP Exhibition (PYPX). As you may know, during the latter part of this school year, students will be involved in in a personal investigation of their choice. Groups will be organised according to interest and students will involve themselves in a collaborative process of inquiry, and be required to present their learning journey to the whole school community.  This is the culminating learning experience of your child’s elementary school experience and very exciting! Please do not contact home room teachers regards this, at this moment in time. You will be introduced to specific details at the scheduled time, after February break. However, as the Fifth Grade art rotation began last week, and shall continue until Mid-March, art class is currently helping to prepare students to ‘tune in’ to the idea of investigating a PYP transdisciplinary theme, Central Idea, Concept, make specific connections with the UN Sustainable Development Goals, and to develop an understanding that there are a variety of art forms, which they could choose to utilize, later.

Identifying Transdisciplinary Themes, PYP Concepts and UN Sustainable Development Goals

During our first week of art class, through close observation/analysis of various artworks, students had the opportunity to clarify their understanding of the PYP Transdisciplinary Themes and Concepts and the UN Sustainable Development Goals. They have begun to consider how art can be used as a means of raising awareness of such issues.

Students have been exposed to the work or artists who clearly have something to say. Completely open to personal interpretation, students have worked as a whole class, to seek meaning, and identify the Transdisciplinary Theme, PYP Concepts and UN Sustainable Goal in various artworks. So far we have specifically observed the work of Jo Atherton, Yayoi Kusama and Von Wong. 

Exposure to a variety of art making forms

During week two and three, students are being reminded that art comes in a variety of forms, such as painting, drawing, construction, collage, and photography. The intention here is to open their minds to the various media which they could use, if they choose to, as a means of expression during their upcoming personal learning journey. It is already a busy and exciting time, as students have rotated through teacher directed, art stations. All classes are contributing to the same stations. They are reminded to constantly keep in mind, the question “How can I use creativity to express a matter which is important to me?”

PYP Attitudes/Attributes (Learner Profile)

Incorporated into all, is consideration of the PYP Learner Profile. A shared painting can be a challenge and cause great frustration when a partner removes, changes, or transforms an area of a work with which you held a moment of great pride. A strong sense of perseverance, and acceptance is required  and students are being encouraged to be responsible and caring in their approach to all. I am pleased to report, that to date, a large percentage of students are demonstrating high levels of positivity in this regard. In fact, as the week has progressed, excited students have returned to art class before or after school, or during recess, simply to observe the new development that has occured during their time away.

Reflection/Evaluation

Reflection and evaluation comes quite naturally. The art room can be noisy at times,  as students are constantly engaged in talking to each other about what is working and what is not. As we are in the the early stages, some guidance is required in some instances, as they self and peer evaluate. Positive and constructive feedback is encouraged as they make collaborative decisions regards their next steps with the work. At the end of each lesson, a whole class moment of reflection is required, where students discuss challenges met, and any strategies they may be devising to overcome this.

Next Steps

The entire Fifth Grade are working rapidly. It has been amazing to see! For all of us, there are moments or great joy, and moments of disappointment. An artwork can be fabulous one minute, and ruined the next! Tolerance, forgiveness, acceptance, open mindedness, and perseverance are our words of the week! Two weeks of planned work is well under way, and in these early days students are requesting more. Together, we are making decision regards the introduction of new stations. And together, we shall decide, later in the year, and as a result of community feedback, which of our collaborative works we agree to being ‘presentable’ for the exhibition.

Below, I share two videos. Von Wong’s ‘The Last Straw’ and his artwork ‘The Parting of the Plastic Seas’, and a video of Fifth Grade artists at work.

 

Third Grade: HWEO Exploring Culture Through Art

(Note: YouTube Video/Audio may be more accessible via PC or Laptop)

Connecting: Relating artistic ideas and work with personal meaning and external context: Relate: Relate artistic ideas with Societal, cultural, and historical context to deepen understanding. (National Core Art Standards) PYP Phase 2 Responding: Investigate the purposes of artwork from different times, places and a range of cultures including their own

Both in their home room class, and art, Third Grade have begun the transdisciplinary unit of Inquiry: How We Express Ourselves. This means we address the same Key Concepts of Connection and Perspective, through the Central idea that ‘Through examining the arts, people gain insight into culture’. 

Considering questions such as “What is culture? How is culture expressed through the arts? What are some expressions of culture? And how does art help us understand the lives of people of different times, places and cultures (National Core Art Standards), and in addition to exposure to a variety of cultural reflections through the arts in their homeroom, art students have begun to specifically observe Australian Aboriginal Dot Paintings. Discussions around the meaning of ‘The Dreamtime’ lead to some wonderful and respectful listening to, and speaking about, various third grade multicultural theories/perspectives, about the beginning of time and creation.

To assist immediate engagement, students have been provided the opportunity to simply practise the very enjoyable activity of creating dot marks, while observing details in some Australian Aboriginal art works. While doing so, students have been exposed to music of the Didgeridoo, and listened to Dreamtime Stories such as Ka-ro-ra (an Aboriginal Creation Myth) The Rainbow Serpent, Tiddalik the Frog, How the Kangaroos Got their Tails, and How the Birds got their Colors.

As we move into the next stage of the unit, students are beginning to notice a common thread of symbols within the works and questions are starting to emerge regards their meaning, and ways in which they might help us to understand stories, beliefs and/or lifestyles.

For now, I leave you with a video of our first two lessons, and examples of some beautiful exploratory work happening in the art room. Enjoy!

 

Fifth Grade: Assessments, Seesaw, and Documenting Process

After tuning into the characteristics of art works from the Op Art Movement, investigating, exploring, and trying out different methods in their process journal, students have been assigned their final work. They have four lessons to complete a work using paper, scissors and glue only, ensuring that their choices are governed by their knowledge and understanding of art elements and principles, in particular, Contrast, Movement and Space.

The assessment of art is very holistic. It views the process as a whole, as well as the quality of the final product. Students have been provided (via Seesaw Assignments) this simple explanation of how they can reach our curriculum standards. It is posted on our Smart Board and discussed during every lesson, as a reminder.

 

You may have noticed several Seesaw Posts this week, which your child has uploaded. This is not finished work for presentation. It is part of the requirement to document the process as they work through the assignment. There may be several photos of the work at the various stages. Students are encouraged to be independently responsible for ongoing documentation of the process. It may be simply a photo, or they may include a sentence about the stage they are at, their current thinking, and intentions for next steps. From myself, you may see a simple ‘like’ as an acknowledgement that they are working along this path, or there may be a constructive comment, to reassure them that they are reaching the set criteria or advice on next steps. A simple ‘like’ or words of encouragement from you, will always be motivational for your child.

Example of a student’s post: Photo Only

Example of a student’s post: Photo and reflection

Example of a student’s post: Photo, student thoughts, and teacher comment.

 

Fifth Grade: Tune In & Investigate

Welcome back to art! Fifth Grade Learners are now experiencing their second of a six week unit (12 lessons). It has been a great start, with all demonstrating enthusiasm for the subject. Continued emphasis is placed on the Inquiry Cycle, otherwise known in art as the Creative Process, or Design Cycle. We have started this unit by gaining a clear understanding of our end goal, and discussing the process of arriving there. Tune In/Research Investigate, Develop Skills/Generate Ideas, Plan/Create, Seek Feedback/Improve (throughout), Reflect/Evaluate/Improve, Present. This inquiry is ‘guided’. This means that the end goal has been selected for students. However, they will have some freedom, in the ways they reach their final realisation. The goal is to develop and create an artwork inspired by the Op Art Movement, and one which clearly utilizes the art elements of movement. contrast and space. The following information has been provided to students and discussed in class.

Tuning In: During week one, students tuned in by observing the work of artists Bridget Riley and Victor Vasarely. They have worked on identifying the methods these two artists applied, in order to create a sense of movement, space and contrast in their work.

Investigate: How can I create a sense of movement, space and contrast in my work? During week two, students have been given freedom of choice in selecting the materials with which they would like to experiment, in order to find solutions to this question. With provided examples of Vasserly and Riley’s work, copying was permitted, in order to find our way and get into the flow. Once ready, students have been encouraged to use iPads for personal research of the Op Art movement, and move forward as inventors/creators themselves.

Self Directed Learning: Many students have demonstrated enthusiasm to further investigate in their own time at home. No homework has been issued though such self directed learning is highly encouraged. Some example videos have been uploaded to SeeSaw which students can access in their own time, should they wish.

For now, we leave you with a short video clip, of our students fully engaged in their individual creative activities, and a taste of the art room ambience (volume required), as has been the scene this week. It is such a pleasure to observe the wide range of ideas beginning to emerge, as student confidence grows.

Second Grade: The Language of Art & Self Talk

Note: Videos and Audio in this post maybe be more easily accessed via laptop or PC

Thank you for signing up to our Grades 1-5 Art Blog. We hope that the first few weeks have run smoothly for you and that you are feeling settled. The first couple of weeks for students, is all about establishing routines and finding our comfort level in the art room. With this in place, we have begun our first unit of the year which focuses on the PYP Transdisciplinary Theme of ‘How We Express Ourselves’ and the Central Idea “Artists use their creativity in many different ways to express feelings and ideas”, and more specifically, the Line of Inquiry ‘Artistic inspiration and creativity are connected to personal experiences’. 

This year’s blog starts with a short video clip, giving you a sneak peak into a Second Grade Art Class. Art Class can be loud at times, and for this reason, I am often pleased that we are situated away from other classrooms. There will be times devoted to creative thinking, where silence is required and there are other times when noise is encouraged, in a productive way of course. Young children naturally self talk as they play and work through tasks. We have started the year with clearly pointing out the importance of making use of art specific vocabulary whilst talking about our work. We are slowly building word lists, which students will be increasingly encouraged to apply both in writing and speaking, during critique, analysis, reflection and evaluation. Self talk helps us to internalise the process we are experiencing, and solve ‘problems’ both independently, and together. It is also normal at the start of the year to hear comments such as “Mine’s bad” or “Yours is better than mine” and we are working towards helping students to make use of positive self talk as a means of developing a growth mindset.

Some of the vocabulary introduced may seem advanced. However, in general second graders are perfectly capable of learning and using them, even if they cannot spell them! Art words introduced in the last couple of weeks: Hundertwasser, Primary, Secondary, Tertiary and Analogous colors, Line, Shape, Space, Repetition, variety and brush stroke. Color words also include blue-violet, red-violet for example.

(Images borrowed from: www.hundertwasser.com and Pixabay)

Second Grade have been observing the work of Austrian artists Friedensreich Hundertwasser (Slides) and discussing his use of art elements in both his architectural designs and paintings. Through this, and specific (whole class) analysis of his work ‘Lollipop Trees’, students have been practising the skill of controlling their brush and paint while mixing primary colors to make secondary and a variety of tertiary. Eg. Red + Yellow = Orange. Yellow + Orange = Yellow Orange, while independently mimicking the style of Hundertwasser’s lollipop trees. This knowledge, and these skills have been further applied to a group work, incorporating some inspiration gained from observing Van Gogh’s Starry Night, noting his thick brush strokes and use of line and movement in particular, to create a forest themed landscape as a final work. 

(Image borrowed from www.art.com)

Art lessons to date have focused on use of vocabulary, positive self talk, color mixing with paint and appropriate use of materials and tools (investigation, exploration, skills). The creative element of the art process shall be our next step as students think on a more independent level, and plan out a relief work in the medium of clay.  Please enjoy these photos from the last couple of weeks.

Fourth Grade: PYP Who We Are

(This post contains a link to a Student Seesaw Post. In order to listen to/watch the post, it may be better to view from a PC or Laptop)

Welcome back! We hope you are well rested after the holiday. It is time for a quick catch up on Fourth Grade Art. Before the holiday, students completed the first half of this trimester’s art rotation. This means we have three more weeks to go (6 lessons).

For the second time this year, Fourth Grade are involved in a Transdisciplinary Unit. This means that in art we are addressing the same theme and concept, which they have previously (with the exception of 4PM, who are due to start) investigated in their regular classroom. The PYP Unit of Inquiry was, and is in Art now, ‘Who We Are’. The PYP Transdisciplinary Theme of Who We Are addresses questions about culture, beliefs and values. Following on from their home classroom UOI, students are continuing to develop an understanding of the Central Idea: Beliefs and Values contribute to identity and an understanding of diversity, with the key concept of Perspective (What are the points of view? Different ways of looking, interpretation and understanding).

In art class, we are approaching our own Line of Inquiry: People of all cultures use creativity to tell stories about their beliefs and values. 

Tuning in to a Mask Making Unit

(Image borrowed from mapio.net)

There is nothing better than a primary source to spur curiosity and generate questions. Students have tuned into the central idea, concepts and line of inquiry by observing two masks originating from the island of Bali, Indonesia, and using a secondary source (Youtube) to gain a sense of the masks in action, and the sounds of Gamelan and environment surrounding them. With much excitement, many questions arose, around who they are, where they are from, what are they for, how were they made? Students have been exposed to the story of Barong and Rangda at a very basic level (as to some they may appear frightening!), concluding that they portray the Hindu belief/value in balance. With the knowledge that one character is good, and one evil, students practiced their Thinking Skills by observing and describing the visual characteristics of the mask, paying close attention to the craftsmanship, and point of view as an artist: “how did the artist use the elements of art and principles of design to express the character of these mythical creatures?” All students should have uploaded their thoughts to Seesaw. A great example is that of Ariel’s (4MA). Well done to Ariel.

For Ariel’s (Class 4MA) Observations & Thoughts, Click Here

The Creative Process – Developing Skills & Create

Usually, we would spend time, planning for a mask of our own (designing), and one which may express our own values/beliefs However, as this was a focus of our last unit (many lessons were spent generating ideas for a painting) this trimester we have skipped directly to developing skills and creating, as we do need the extra time for ‘making’. So, this time, having also viewed some images of masks from other cultures, students are diving in! This is  spontaneous creativity! Most have ideas in their minds, but have not been required to share this yet (Reflection/Evaluation to come later). During this part of the process, students are developing skills by changing the shape and building on a basic form by use of cut out cardboard pieces, and the creation of 3D shapes, to add to the original form (This is not easy). Having created a strong foundation, they have been learning to use paper and paste to form one piece. This, as you might imagine, is more than fun, for all.

So here we are, ready to embark on our fourth week. For more news, watch this space!

 

 

 

 

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