Grades 1-5 Art

Category: PYP Key Concept: Connection (Page 1 of 2)

Third Grade: How We Express Ourselves (Transdisciplinary Unit)

“Fish printing is called Gyotaku. In Japan, fishermen used to make a print of the fish they caught to save a memory of that fish. These days, it is an art. If you want to make a fish print, you take an ink roller and then you take a plastic printing plate. You roll the ink on the plate with the ink roller and then take your fish, put it on the ink, and then you stamp on paper. After that you can take a liner or black pen to add small details to the fish.”

By Dima 3CB

“This is Buchae from Korea. It is used for traditional dance in Korea. It is a really famous dance in Korea. I was inspired to create it because it is so beautiful. First I used stiff paper. Then I painted it. I painted white feathers with pink paint and stuck them to the fan. It painted really well. It was challenging to paint the fan because I first painted the roses, and the leaves and then I made the background, so I had to paint the leaves again”.

By Liza 3CK

Third Grade students have been involved in a Transdisciplinary Unit: How We Express Ourselves. This means that both in their classroom Unit of Inquiry, and in art, we address the same Central Idea :Through examining the arts, people can gain insights into culture”, while keeping in mind, the Key and Related Concepts of Perspective, Connection and Communication. In art, we have addressed questions such as “How is art an expression of culture? What is symbolism? How can art communicate personal stories, values and beliefs?”

This unit provides us the perfect opportunity to address both the ‘Creating, and Responding” Standards, from the National Core Art Curriculum Standards. Students are required to speculate about processes an artist uses to create a work of art, determine messages communicated by an image, and interpret art by analysing use of media to create subject matter.

Our most important objective, is that we are able to maintain opportunity for student agency and choice, as a means of ensuring optimal engagement for all.

In art class, the unit was launched before December break. Students were introduced to art works and designs found in Australian Aboriginal Dot Paintings, New Zealand Maori tattoos, wood carvings and jewellery, Mexican Huichol Yarn Paintings and Ancient Egyptian Wall Paintings. As a whole class students analysed and critiqued examples of these, taking note of repeating shapes, patterns and imagery, and sought meaning. What could they tell us about the location of the artists? What do we already know about these locations, or people, or cultures? What could repeating motifs/symbols tell us about what is important to this culture – beliefs, values and lifestyles?

Students discovered these through observational drawing. Provided with many examples, students were offered choices to investigate those which appealed to them most, through a variety of drawing and painting tools.

During this investigational time, students identified the location of the peoples/cultures on the world map, listened to some stories, music, viewed some dance videos, and delved a little deeper into symbolism in Australian Aboriginal Dot Paintings, working on making connections with all of the above.

Our work before December break was a good introduction to how art can address the concepts of perspective, communication and connection. Meanwhile, in their home room class, students were beginning to identify a culture for their own personal study.

In their homeroom class, students learned to research a culture of interest to them. A summative task was set, for students to demonstrate their understanding of the Central Idea, through a presentation, which incorporated an example of one of the arts from the chosen culture. Students were allowed to choose visual, or a performing art (eg music, dance, drama).

Those who made a strong connection to a visual art, were provided up to three art classes to work on their art piece. Additional time was given, for students to use our ‘action station’ (art area outside the art room) at a time agreed with their home room teacher.

With this, students were able to demonstrate their ability to plan an art work, make decisions on materials and tools they need, set up, and be responsible for, their workspace, and independently manage their time.

It was fabulous to see so many Third Graders choosing visual art as their art form and independently taking responsibility for their own learning. We saw the creation of art works from a variety of cultures, in a wide range of media.

Herewith, a small gallery of some finished products, and a video of our awesome artists in action. Enjoy!

Third Grade: Artists Observe

For the past three lessons, Third Grade students have been involved in investigations to kick start the Transdisciplinary Unit ‘How We Express Ourselves‘, which involves connecting with the same Central Idea, currently, or soon to be, the focus of their Classroom Unit of Inquiry: “Through examining the arts, people can gain insights into culture“. In art, we follow the Line of Inquiry “Art is representation of time, place and culture, and understanding symbolism helps us gain a sense of the artist’s perspective

Both in class and in the art studio, emphasis is placed on the concepts of Perspective, Communication and Connection, and the ‘Approach to Learning‘: Research.

The past three lessons could be seen as ‘small tasters’ of culture through art. Students have been exposed to a variety of art, by which an interpretation of symbols, can inform us of the location of the artist, climate, environment, values and beliefs. They have been ‘Responding‘ to art works through discussion of what we already know, personal interpretation, artist and viewer’s perspective.

Students have been exposed to Cave art, Australian Aboriginal Dot Painting, Huichol Yarn Painting, Ancient Egyptian Wall Painting, and Maori Design. For now, we simply observe. Which elements of art and principles of design are found in these works? Where do we find repetition, and of what? What could this mean, or communicate about the life of these artists? These are simply questions for now, as AAS artists investigate/research, through observation. AAS artists have had choices in the media they work with, and to focus on the style of art which interests them most. Whilst working, they have watched music and dance videos, and located the art on a world map.

In the new year, students will choose a culture of personal interest, to research in their classroom. They will be allowed to use the art studio to plan and create art of their choice, to support their classroom Unit of Inquiry. For those who do not choose to use the art studio to directly connect with their class work, there will be more of a guided inquiry into symbolism in art.

 

AAS 70th Anniversary Artwork

You may have noticed three large paintings (1.5m square, each), recently hung near to the ES Office. Sofiya Shiyan (Class of 2020) led Grade 4-5 students, and some Grade 9 student assistants, in creating this artwork to mark the 70th Anniversary of AAS.

The three colors represent our three divisions – Elementary, Middle, and High School. The variety of shades/tints and shapes represent the 60+ nationalities of students, who attend AAS. Please enjoy the photos below, of student involvement in this permanent artwork.

AAS Moscow, October 2019

Respect – Integrity – Courage – Curiosity – Care

The Beauty of Choice Based Art

A choice based program allows students to home into specific personal interests, and take control of their own learning. This in turn, is a great motivator and generally there is 100% engagement happening in ‘Our Studio’. As students are becoming familiar with ways in which they can navigate the environment, many are arriving with preconceived ideas regarding how they wish to spend their time. The teacher can then guide and facilitate this, expose them to possibilities, new art vocabulary, and further assist students in making personal connections to the art world.

Example: For weeks on end Jaden’s choice as been to draw buildings. Every week they look the same. Noticing this repeated behaviour, it was suggested that he try something new. “But I LOVE drawing buildings” says Jaden. He explains his personal connection to a specific city, which is well known for it’s stunning architecture and we began to find images to take a closer look at details. Jaden learned that artists can create ‘cityscapes’.

We then embarked on some brief research into the artist Stephen Wiltshire

Artist traits such as closely observing, engaging, and perseverance was discussed and with this Jaden has discovered a greater determination for detail, working up until the last minute of art class. I’m personally hoping this personal connection may spur Jaden’s interest in finding new art forms in which to express his ideas, as the school year continues. We currently have Drawing, Painting and Collage stations open now. Slowly construction and printmaking shall emerge in the second semester.  

Please enjoy this short video about the fascinating story for Stephen Wiltshire. Many, more lengthy documentaries, can be found on Youtube.

 

All Grades: Eco Fair Art Opportunity

Eco Fair Art Opportunity

Looking for a fun and meaningful, art activity during the holidays?

All ES Artists are invited to create an artwork for our ECO FAIR art exhibit. All works will be shown.

Theme; Wildlife Animals, Birds or Insects

Create a 2D or 3D artwork of your favorite Wildlife.

2D artworks should be no bigger than an A3 paper.

Choose any art form you like! Painting, Drawing, Printmaking, Junk Modelling, Sculpture, Photography.

  • Bring your finished work to the Hall of Flags on Thursday 18 April
  • Pin it on the boards available on the day
  • Place 3D art works on the table
  • Be sure that your name and class can be seen on the work.

Thank you for bringing joy, celebration and color to our Eco Fair, through art!

 

 

Fifth Grade: Artists as Change Makers

(Videos in this post may be easier to view from a laptop or PC)

Transdisciplinary Theme: How We Express Ourselves, PYP Key Concept: Perspective

Central Idea: Collaborative Inquiry is a journey which empowers students to demonstrate life-long skills and dispositions which lead to action.

Line of Inquiry: Artists work together use creativity to raise awareness of matters that are important to them.

Note: Our line of Inquiry strives to place emphasis on three things: Collaboration, Change Makers, Global Issues & Citizenship.

Welcome back! This is going to be a long blog post (student video at end of this post). My aim is to enlighten you, as best possible regards this year’s strong integration of art and the upcoming Grade 5 PYP Exhibition (PYPX). As you may know, during the latter part of this school year, students will be involved in in a personal investigation of their choice. Groups will be organised according to interest and students will involve themselves in a collaborative process of inquiry, and be required to present their learning journey to the whole school community.  This is the culminating learning experience of your child’s elementary school experience and very exciting! Please do not contact home room teachers regards this, at this moment in time. You will be introduced to specific details at the scheduled time, after February break. However, as the Fifth Grade art rotation began last week, and shall continue until Mid-March, art class is currently helping to prepare students to ‘tune in’ to the idea of investigating a PYP transdisciplinary theme, Central Idea, Concept, make specific connections with the UN Sustainable Development Goals, and to develop an understanding that there are a variety of art forms, which they could choose to utilize, later.

Identifying Transdisciplinary Themes, PYP Concepts and UN Sustainable Development Goals

During our first week of art class, through close observation/analysis of various artworks, students had the opportunity to clarify their understanding of the PYP Transdisciplinary Themes and Concepts and the UN Sustainable Development Goals. They have begun to consider how art can be used as a means of raising awareness of such issues.

Students have been exposed to the work or artists who clearly have something to say. Completely open to personal interpretation, students have worked as a whole class, to seek meaning, and identify the Transdisciplinary Theme, PYP Concepts and UN Sustainable Goal in various artworks. So far we have specifically observed the work of Jo Atherton, Yayoi Kusama and Von Wong. 

Exposure to a variety of art making forms

During week two and three, students are being reminded that art comes in a variety of forms, such as painting, drawing, construction, collage, and photography. The intention here is to open their minds to the various media which they could use, if they choose to, as a means of expression during their upcoming personal learning journey. It is already a busy and exciting time, as students have rotated through teacher directed, art stations. All classes are contributing to the same stations. They are reminded to constantly keep in mind, the question “How can I use creativity to express a matter which is important to me?”

PYP Attitudes/Attributes (Learner Profile)

Incorporated into all, is consideration of the PYP Learner Profile. A shared painting can be a challenge and cause great frustration when a partner removes, changes, or transforms an area of a work with which you held a moment of great pride. A strong sense of perseverance, and acceptance is required  and students are being encouraged to be responsible and caring in their approach to all. I am pleased to report, that to date, a large percentage of students are demonstrating high levels of positivity in this regard. In fact, as the week has progressed, excited students have returned to art class before or after school, or during recess, simply to observe the new development that has occured during their time away.

Reflection/Evaluation

Reflection and evaluation comes quite naturally. The art room can be noisy at times,  as students are constantly engaged in talking to each other about what is working and what is not. As we are in the the early stages, some guidance is required in some instances, as they self and peer evaluate. Positive and constructive feedback is encouraged as they make collaborative decisions regards their next steps with the work. At the end of each lesson, a whole class moment of reflection is required, where students discuss challenges met, and any strategies they may be devising to overcome this.

Next Steps

The entire Fifth Grade are working rapidly. It has been amazing to see! For all of us, there are moments or great joy, and moments of disappointment. An artwork can be fabulous one minute, and ruined the next! Tolerance, forgiveness, acceptance, open mindedness, and perseverance are our words of the week! Two weeks of planned work is well under way, and in these early days students are requesting more. Together, we are making decision regards the introduction of new stations. And together, we shall decide, later in the year, and as a result of community feedback, which of our collaborative works we agree to being ‘presentable’ for the exhibition.

Below, I share two videos. Von Wong’s ‘The Last Straw’ and his artwork ‘The Parting of the Plastic Seas’, and a video of Fifth Grade artists at work.

 

Third Grade: HWEO: Storytelling through Art

(Note: Videos and Audio Links may be more easily accessible via laptop or PC)

Please refer to the blog post dated 8 December to understand the context of this blog post. As a reminder, this is a transdisciplinary unit (How We Express Ourselves” with the shared Central Idea: ‘Through examining the arts, people gain insight into culture’. 

Third Grade Learners have continued to investigate the question “How does art help us to understand the lives of people of different times, places and cultures?” by focusing on the dot paintings of the Australian aboriginal people. The majority of students now recognise the symbols in the work and understand that the stories they tell, relate to cultural beliefs, environmental factors and lifestyles.

Students have thoroughly enjoyed creating their own dot paintings. These artworks are not intended to recreate an aboriginal style painting at all. But rather to gain experience with new materials (Tempera on canvas). To allow for some individual creativity and artistic knowledge and skills, they have been encouraged to select their own thoughtful color combinations and make choices to include symbols they have learned, or to create their own to tell a short story. There has been much freedom, with the focus on controlling the materials and tools. Their Seesaw post should demonstrate some reflective thinking, inclusive of challenges they met and strategies for improvement.

Lola’s Seesaw Post demonstrates her understanding that symbols in a work can reveal a story. She also discusses her choice of color combinations, the challenges she met and strategies for improvement.

Click here to view/hear Lola’s Seesaw Post

Please enjoy the video below of students at work and some final artworks.

 

Third Grade: HWEO Exploring Culture Through Art

(Note: YouTube Video/Audio may be more accessible via PC or Laptop)

Connecting: Relating artistic ideas and work with personal meaning and external context: Relate: Relate artistic ideas with Societal, cultural, and historical context to deepen understanding. (National Core Art Standards) PYP Phase 2 Responding: Investigate the purposes of artwork from different times, places and a range of cultures including their own

Both in their home room class, and art, Third Grade have begun the transdisciplinary unit of Inquiry: How We Express Ourselves. This means we address the same Key Concepts of Connection and Perspective, through the Central idea that ‘Through examining the arts, people gain insight into culture’. 

Considering questions such as “What is culture? How is culture expressed through the arts? What are some expressions of culture? And how does art help us understand the lives of people of different times, places and cultures (National Core Art Standards), and in addition to exposure to a variety of cultural reflections through the arts in their homeroom, art students have begun to specifically observe Australian Aboriginal Dot Paintings. Discussions around the meaning of ‘The Dreamtime’ lead to some wonderful and respectful listening to, and speaking about, various third grade multicultural theories/perspectives, about the beginning of time and creation.

To assist immediate engagement, students have been provided the opportunity to simply practise the very enjoyable activity of creating dot marks, while observing details in some Australian Aboriginal art works. While doing so, students have been exposed to music of the Didgeridoo, and listened to Dreamtime Stories such as Ka-ro-ra (an Aboriginal Creation Myth) The Rainbow Serpent, Tiddalik the Frog, How the Kangaroos Got their Tails, and How the Birds got their Colors.

As we move into the next stage of the unit, students are beginning to notice a common thread of symbols within the works and questions are starting to emerge regards their meaning, and ways in which they might help us to understand stories, beliefs and/or lifestyles.

For now, I leave you with a video of our first two lessons, and examples of some beautiful exploratory work happening in the art room. Enjoy!

 

First Grade: Who We Are

Note: Video and Audio may be accessed more easily if viewing from a laptop or PC.

Parents will be aware that First Grade students are currently working on the Unit of Inquiry ‘Who We Are’, which is ‘an inquiry into the nature of the self, with a focus on culture. This is a transdisciplinary unit, which means that Specialist Subject teachers, as well as classroom teachers, have carefully planned lessons together, around the Central Idea ‘Exploring culture allows people to develop their sense of identity and make connections’. In art we are working along the Line of Inquiry ‘Motif designs in fabrics and everyday objects come in identifiable forms’ and that ‘Culture is connected to identity’. With the Key Concept of Connection, we also focus on the Related Concepts of Identity, Culture and Diversity. 

During the first few art classes students have been working through the investigational/finding out stage of the inquiry cycle by observing motifs, repetition and pattern in various cultural designs. Through observational drawing, students are exposed to a number of designs, specific to various cultures, and have been encouraged to notice the style and its use of nature, geometric and organic shape. Students have been asked to open their eyes to designs they may find in their home, beit in curtains, carpets, clothes, plates, cups, and question the origin of the design with parents. Some indeed, have made strong connections.

Introducing new media, developing skills, and creative thinking.

For the last three weeks, working on a rotation, students have had the opportunity to explore the use of ink stamps, Indian wood blocks with paint, and paper cut outs, while they experiment with creating their own motifs, pattern and repetition. They have been required to use the materials appropriately, and carefully consider arrangements of shape and color. Watch this space for following information in upcoming weeks, as students continue to practise printmaking and become designers themselves.

 

Second Grade: Developing Skills, Procedures, and making Personal Connections

This completed group painting can be found on the large bulletin board outside the ES Office.  Second Grade have been following through the design (inquiry cycle), and it therefore should be noted, that this work is not specifically the ‘grand finale’ but simply an exercise which has resulted in something beautiful! Please see the previous posts as a reminder of how this work has been inspired by an investigation into the work of the artist Hundertwasser and his ‘Lollipop Trees’, and the skills/knowledge practised during this ‘Tuning in/Finding Out, and Skills Development’ time.

During the last couple of weeks, continuing to consider the Central Idea “Artists use their creativity in many different ways to express feelings and ideas”, and more specifically, the Line of Inquiry ‘Artistic inspiration and creativity are connected to personal experiences’, students have switched to a new medium: clay. As Hundertwasser may have imagined known environments in creative ways, students were asked to connect to personal experience of a place they know, or a combination of places they know, to envision and create something new. Visual prompts included our very own school and playground.

It was a proud moment to hear and see, many students clearly building upon knowledge and skills gained in their last semester of First Grade, as they remembered vocabulary and were able to apply the ‘Four S’s’ (Score, Slip, Squish, Smooth’) method of attaching clay in a secure manner. Always reinforcing the Elements of Art, interesting shape in particular has been a focus, and thoughtful use of space, as they worked on a clay tile relief. With the absence of color, students have been learning to fill space with texture, and tried to contrast their application of texture when applying to foreground and background (photos of added texture to come) Students have continued to gain an understanding of the sensitivity of clay, and have been responsible for the airtight packaging of it, to maintain it’s moisture in between lessons. Photos of the works, complete with applied texture, will be posted soon. For now, an insight into Penguin Artists at work as they create, with personal experiences in mind.

 

 

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