Grades 1-5 Art

Category: Art Element: Space

Fifth Grade: Tune In & Investigate

Welcome back to art! Fifth Grade Learners are now experiencing their second of a six week unit (12 lessons). It has been a great start, with all demonstrating enthusiasm for the subject. Continued emphasis is placed on the Inquiry Cycle, otherwise known in art as the Creative Process, or Design Cycle. We have started this unit by gaining a clear understanding of our end goal, and discussing the process of arriving there. Tune In/Research Investigate, Develop Skills/Generate Ideas, Plan/Create, Seek Feedback/Improve (throughout), Reflect/Evaluate/Improve, Present. This inquiry is ‘guided’. This means that the end goal has been selected for students. However, they will have some freedom, in the ways they reach their final realisation. The goal is to develop and create an artwork inspired by the Op Art Movement, and one which clearly utilizes the art elements of movement. contrast and space. The following information has been provided to students and discussed in class.

Tuning In: During week one, students tuned in by observing the work of artists Bridget Riley and Victor Vasarely. They have worked on identifying the methods these two artists applied, in order to create a sense of movement, space and contrast in their work.

Investigate: How can I create a sense of movement, space and contrast in my work? During week two, students have been given freedom of choice in selecting the materials with which they would like to experiment, in order to find solutions to this question. With provided examples of Vasserly and Riley’s work, copying was permitted, in order to find our way and get into the flow. Once ready, students have been encouraged to use iPads for personal research of the Op Art movement, and move forward as inventors/creators themselves.

Self Directed Learning: Many students have demonstrated enthusiasm to further investigate in their own time at home. No homework has been issued though such self directed learning is highly encouraged. Some example videos have been uploaded to SeeSaw which students can access in their own time, should they wish.

For now, we leave you with a short video clip, of our students fully engaged in their individual creative activities, and a taste of the art room ambience (volume required), as has been the scene this week. It is such a pleasure to observe the wide range of ideas beginning to emerge, as student confidence grows.

Second Grade: Developing Skills, Procedures, and making Personal Connections

This completed group painting can be found on the large bulletin board outside the ES Office.  Second Grade have been following through the design (inquiry cycle), and it therefore should be noted, that this work is not specifically the ‘grand finale’ but simply an exercise which has resulted in something beautiful! Please see the previous posts as a reminder of how this work has been inspired by an investigation into the work of the artist Hundertwasser and his ‘Lollipop Trees’, and the skills/knowledge practised during this ‘Tuning in/Finding Out, and Skills Development’ time.

During the last couple of weeks, continuing to consider the Central Idea “Artists use their creativity in many different ways to express feelings and ideas”, and more specifically, the Line of Inquiry ‘Artistic inspiration and creativity are connected to personal experiences’, students have switched to a new medium: clay. As Hundertwasser may have imagined known environments in creative ways, students were asked to connect to personal experience of a place they know, or a combination of places they know, to envision and create something new. Visual prompts included our very own school and playground.

It was a proud moment to hear and see, many students clearly building upon knowledge and skills gained in their last semester of First Grade, as they remembered vocabulary and were able to apply the ‘Four S’s’ (Score, Slip, Squish, Smooth’) method of attaching clay in a secure manner. Always reinforcing the Elements of Art, interesting shape in particular has been a focus, and thoughtful use of space, as they worked on a clay tile relief. With the absence of color, students have been learning to fill space with texture, and tried to contrast their application of texture when applying to foreground and background (photos of added texture to come) Students have continued to gain an understanding of the sensitivity of clay, and have been responsible for the airtight packaging of it, to maintain it’s moisture in between lessons. Photos of the works, complete with applied texture, will be posted soon. For now, an insight into Penguin Artists at work as they create, with personal experiences in mind.

 

 

First Grade: Finished Product, Eric Carle Painted Paper Collages

Please see previous posts to understand how we arrived here! Our final product; Painted Paper Collage Gallery

 

Fifth Grade: Discuss and Present

Today’s post contains a slide show of Gr 5 final products with music. If you are viewing from a smartphone or tablet, please go directly to the AAS blog site by clicking here, in order receive the full version. Please also be aware that the sound starts on the fifth slide, and your volume may need adjusting.

Art time for Fifth Grade students has come to an end for now. It has been a pleasure to observe all work through the process of investigation and creative exploration of materials. As mentioned in previous posts, the final requirement was for students to be able to write or speak about their work on Seesaw, using art specific vocabulary, and to be able to reflect upon feedback from peers and their teacher, and how this may have have influenced their decision making over time. All parents should have received Seesaw notification of their child’s entry by the end of this weekend. For now, we are proud to present some of our final products. Next Friday 8 December a few students will present in Assembly. Thank you in advance to Andrew, Victoria, Alexia, Lisa, and Zian, who are planning to present on behalf of the entire Fifth Grade. Student art work will be displayed around school in the new year.

 

Fourth Grade – End of Year

The majority of students have completed their work and will bring it home soon. Please take a moment to discuss the work with your child. It is important that the work is valued beyond the aesthetic. Through this work, your child has demonstrated commitment, perseverance and patience over a number of weeks. Ask your child to explain the entire process to you. From the moment, he/she first began to notice the shape of the negative space within a simple houseplant, to creating his/her own view finder to zoom in on one area. To the moment he/she was required to use skills from mathematics to ‘grid up’ and enlarge the image. It is likely that your child will find greatest enthusiasm in discussing his/her use of the color wheel with you. Ask him/her about the warm versus cool colors. Students have observed that the warmer colors create an impression of coming forward, whereas cooler ones tend to stand back, therefore giving a sense of depth and space. Ask “what special effect do the cooler colors have, against the warmer ones?” Ask him/her, how long did it take? How did you blend the analogous colors? How did you know where to place the cooler colors (complementary and contrasting colors) Ask him/her to evaluate “Are you pleased with your work? Why? What is good about it? What did not work so well?” Ask your child about challenges met, and the solutions he/she found. Remind him/her of the outdoor learning experience in the forest, when he/she identified lines, shapes and spaces in the trees, and ask, what is the connection with this final work?” Have your child take pride in his/her work. Take a photo and send it to Grandparents. Place it in a prominent place in your home. And throughout the summer, provide your child continued exposure to the arts and creativity. Expose him/her to the work of others through galleries and museums. Connection is the key. We are now ready and excited for Fifth Grade. Enjoy your summer with family and friends, and safe travels to all.

Third Grade – End of Year

The majority of students have completed their work and will bring it home soon. Please take a moment to discuss the work with your child. It is important that the work is valued beyond the aesthetic. Through this work, your child has demonstrated commitment, perseverance and patience over a number of weeks. Ask your child to explain the entire process to you. Ask him/her, how long did it take? Ask him/her about printmaking, the design principle ’emphasis’, his/her use of layering, his/her use of color, his/her use of mixed media (paint, markers, block printing ink). Ask him/her to evaluate “Are you pleased with your work? Why? What is good about it? What did not work so well?” Ask your child about challenges met, and the solutions he/she found. Remind him/her of the artist Roy Lichtenstein and ask “how did this influence your work (which ideas did you borrow and which ideas were yours?)”  Have your child take pride in his/her work. Take a photo and send it to Grandparents. Place it in a prominent place in your home. And throughout the summer, provide your child continued exposure to the arts and creativity. Expose him/her to the work of others through galleries and museums. Connection is the key. We are now ready and excited for Fourth Grade. Enjoy your summer with family and friends, and safe travels to all.

Fourth Grade – Perspective Continued

It’s always so satisfying to see weeks of work falling into place. Fourth Grade students are finalising their work which focuses on the concept of perspective. Having created their enlarged drawings, they continue to identify positive and negative space, now with use of color. Students have been thoughtfully using the color wheel to identify analogous and complementary colors. With oil pastels, they have practised blending warm analogous colors within the positive space, and cooler ones within the negative. With this, they have carefully applied corresponding complementary colors. Students have begun to discover the sense of depth which color can bring to the work. Reds come to the foreground, blues to the background. All has involved forward thinking, planning, and mapping out, before application, and is leading to a stunning studio work.

Grade 4: Step by step – Perspective

Question: From where do artists find inspiration?

Perspective is always going to be a key, or related concept where art is concerned. Should your art form possess a simple decorative function, or indeed intend to communicate our deepest thoughts and emotions, art will always be a personal observation and interpretation of our world.

Inspired by our Outdoor Learning Specialists, Fourth Grade students have been working through a series of exercises to help them seek observations and interpretations that are not immediately obvious to the eye. Most recently, students have focused on the identification of negative space, and it’s important relationship with the positive. As part of their day’s activities, our Outdoor Learning Specialists initiated this investigation by making the personal connection between the lifelines on the palm of our hands, and the shapes/lines found in the forest trees. This encouraged students to look up, and begin to recognise the relationships between line, shape and space from this new perspective.

As the definition of perspective was introduced in class, and the identification of negative versus positive space, students were exposed to some all time popular optical illusions where the use of positive/negative space is a key factor.

The exposure to optical illusions was intended as a short introduction. However, students were far too excited by these images, to allow only five minutes! Those who’d seen them before, relished the opportunity to help others see the two images, dependent on how one chooses to view them.

From here, students have practised some basic exercises. Students are aware that little personal creativity is involved at this stage of the Creative Process. We are simply developing skills. We are using our knowledge and understanding, to developing our powers of observation, particularly in the identification of negative/positive space.

This week, students continue with basic exercises in observing space and shape. There has been great excitement in the classroom today as students are truly beginning to see in a new light. While identifying the shapes of space within a regular household plant, there have been exclamations of wonder, as students discovered the marks created on the back side of their paper and the entirely new perspective.

With the observation of new shapes through negative space, came new, personal interpretations. “I can see a whale!” “I can see an iguana!” “I can see two wolves howling at the moon!”… And herewith… begins our road to creativity.

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