Grades 1-5 Art

Author: Helen Arnold (Page 1 of 15)

All Grades: Distance Learning End

Click here for Rainbow Art Video

Congratulations on completing six weeks of Distance Learning! Miss Helen will be catching up on Seesaw Posts in the next few days, so continue to look out for comments. I have been truly amazed by the level of engagement from our dedicated artists throughout this time. Thank you to parents for your on-going support. It has been a heart-warming experience, as we pull together as a community. Thank you to everyone.
During our Distance Learning time, AAS Elementary School Artists joined thousands of children, in creating Rainbow Art to share with their community. The Rainbow Art movement originated in Italy and Spain, and soon picked up in the United Kingdom and USA. The children’s art, posted in windows, are a symbol of hope during the testing times of Covid19, and also a sign of appreciation and gratitude for Health Workers, who risk so much on behalf of all of us. Thank you to ES Art Students for bringing, light, love and care to our AAS Community. Stay home. Stay Safe. And ‘Keep on being Creative’.

 

Distance Learning: How to manage time?

Art: Distance Learning 

Dear Parents,

I am posting this here, in order to avoid the need to post it on daily slides every week. Thank you. 

The 20 minute time allocated for art is the minimum requirement. As this is little time, please know that any art activity started on the first lesson of the week, can carry over to the last one. Students may use two art times to work on one piece. In fact I would encourage this. The nature of our art program means that students are free to work at their own rate – some will use all the allocated time on one piece of work.  Some will do several things in one week. 

They should upload to Seesaw on the second art lesson of the week. 

The majority of our  AAS students really do love art and will want to spend more time. If this is your child, I recommend that you save art to be the last activity for the day, so that they may spend as much time as they like (with your permission of course) on being creative.

Thank you for your attention,

Helen Arnold

All Grades: Distance Learning & Rainbow Art

Examples of First Grade Rainbow Art 

A quick thank you for the support you are providing students with Distance Learning. A very large number of artists have been actively engaged. This is great to see. Let the motivation continue! Grades 1,2,3 have submitted some wonderful Rainbow art this week, demonstrating a great variety of creativity and approaches to the idea of bringing light and love to our community through their art. This idea has been inspired by a current trend in the UK and some parts of the USA where children are posting Rainbows in their windows. See here for news article. Grades 4 and 5 will be asked to contribute next week (Deadline will be Friday 10 April), after they have completed their transdisciplinary work (Unit of Inquiry related Art). We hope to put these together, to form one large community artwork (or slide show) for our end year ‘virtual’ closing ceremony. Therefore, good clear photos, with no text boxes are encouraged for this work. Stay home, stay safe, and keep on being creative!

Correction: Distance Learning Art

Yesterday’s post stated that students will have 40 minutes x 2 a week, allocated to art. My apologies. This was an error.

Grades 1-5 are allocated 20 minutes x 2 a week. Therefore they are expected to spend a total of 40 minutes per week on art.

Students are of course welcomed to spend as much time as they like on their art. The 40 minutes is the minimum requirement. However, they should be helped to manage their time, ensuring they spend the correct amount of time on other subjects too.

Many thanks for your understanding.

Distance Learning: Art

Dear Parents

On Tuesday 17 March, students will bring home their art portfolio. This is the collection of art pieces they have created this school year. Please know this is a working document which they will need for their Distance Learning. Therefore, they should store it safely upon arriving home, and await instructions for the work next week.

From 23rd March, Students will receive activites for art twice a week. Activites are designed for 40 minutes each time. Students may want to, and can, spend more time on their art. However they should of course manage their time with other subjects. Please see here, to know which days they are expected to work on art. The information will come via their classroom teacher. Every time they work on their art, students should document their progress on Seesaw.

Art

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
G1

G5

G3

G2

G1

G4

G3

G5

G4

G2

As mentioned above, please keep the portfolio in an accessible place. Some of the distance learning will probably involve working on, photographing, or reflecting upon the work in the folder. It is therefore, very important to keep until 1 May, as it is important to your child’s art program.

Preparing at home for Distance Learning Art

  • Please help them find a workspace – a kitchen table for example.
  • They have been provided an ‘art pack’ which contains a sketchbook and pencil only. They should try to return this to school in August.
  • Online activities will be created in a way that ensures students only need a pencil and paper. However if there are more art materials such as paints, crayons, markers and larger paper in the house, students are encouraged to use them. This is far more fun and interesting for them!

Thank you for your support in these times. Feel free to email me with any questions on Helen.Arnold@aas.ru

 

 

Grades Two to Four: W.O.W

This Cycle, Grades 2-4 have begun thinking about a new W.O.W piece. It was quite amusing yesterday as Second Grade entered the room and saw the above slide on the Smart Board, and one student exclaimed “WOW! Wait…. but we already did a WOW piece!” Yes, and it is time to start another, and another and another, until we reach Grade 12 and beyond! As students become increasingly familiar with this, and thinking/behaving like artists, they will work at different rates, and make this move, more independently.

Now that we are in our second semester of our choice based program it is great to see students increasingly independent in their understanding  of our essential questions “What do artists do?” and “Where do ideas come from?” During the first semester, the focus was very much on self management of the environment (our studio) and time. Organisation has been the key. In order to simply allow them to gain confidence, those who wanted, were allowed to copy from images. This semester we are focusing more on the word ‘original’ in ‘wonderful original work of art – WOW’. Some may still feel the need, and this is ok – however students now encounter questions of “where is the creativity?” , “What are YOU bringing to this work?” and/or “Why/How is this important to you?” as a means of making that closer, personal connection to their art.

As the year has progressed, planning documents have grown, as students now have access to four stations, ie. Art Forms: Drawing, Painting, Collage and Printmaking. Students are encouraged to think about which is their favourite art form – one which they feel most passionate about, and incorporate this, into their ‘WOW’ piece. Fourth grades are taking things a step further by considering combining two art forms, or two skills, which they will later be expected to discuss in their artist’s statement.

We look forward to the results of our second round of WOW projects. (Example of Planning Document below).

 

First to Fourth Grade: Skill Builders, Printmaking & Reflection/Evaluation

A choice based system most certainly does not mean full time free choice. Of course there must be room for specific skill building and learning of new techniques, which students can then apply to their choice based art later.

Since the start of the new year, Grades 1-4 have been involved in some ‘have to’ lessons (otherwise known as Skill Builders), through the introduction of our Printmaking Station. Emphasis has been placed on organisation of workspace, the actual process of various printmaking techniques, and self evaluation and reflection. Printmaking techniques have been planned to allow progression throughout the grade levels.

First Grade: Fingerprinting, Sponge Dot Printing (after observation and critique of pointillism and work of George Seurat), and Printmaking with Found Objects

Second Grade: Styrofoam Prints with washable markers

Third Grade: Styrofoam Prints with washable markers, and basic reduction print with ink (single color/layer)

Fourth Grade: Mono prints, and reduction prints with ink – two colors/layers

Students are encouraged to keep ALL pieces, no matter how ‘bad’ they may turn out. Bad prints are good! Not only will students be able to demonstrate the progression of their skill, they can also use these to discuss their evaluation of the quality of the print, reflect on problems which may be occuring and seek solutions to these, or strategies for improvement.

Ongoing reflection and evaluation should take place through self talk and discussions with peers and the teacher. Thus students are becoming increasingly familiar with discussing their process, inclusive of art specific vocabulary.

Due to lack of time, students are not required to write or record reflections/evaluations on Seesaw daily. Simply uploading a photo of stages of the work, at the end of the lesson is enough to gain a habit of documenting.

In a few weeks students will complete a ‘W.O.W’ piece of art (as a reminder please click on the following link)

First, Second, Fourth and Fifth Grade: W.O.W 

which was posted on 21st November 2019. This will require a more indepth, written or spoken reflection on Seesaw.

Speak to your child about his/her printmaking experience. We hope they can freely discuss their process inclusive of art vocabulary such as ‘found objects, printing plate, printing ink, brayer, sponge, styrofoam…’ according to grade level.

Please enjoy some photos below taken during Printmaking Classes, Grades 1-4.

All Grades: Art Shirts (to be worn over uniform)

We are very excited to announce the arrival of our brand new, art shirts, designed for ES Artists! They are of course supplied to protect student clothes from art materials (as best possible).

However, the design is especially important, as it reinforces the student’s sense of identity, as an artist, and our ongoing mantra “You are the artist, and this is your studio“. We have choices of blue, green, red and yellow. Yes! Color is very important!

All students are expected to wear them over their clothes during art. The majority of students gladly accept this. However there are just one or two who do not want to wear them. Students will be highly encouraged, but not pushed, to wear the art shirts.

Please enjoy these fun photos of the first set of students to wear our very cool art shirts!

Third Grade: How We Express Ourselves (Transdisciplinary Unit)

“Fish printing is called Gyotaku. In Japan, fishermen used to make a print of the fish they caught to save a memory of that fish. These days, it is an art. If you want to make a fish print, you take an ink roller and then you take a plastic printing plate. You roll the ink on the plate with the ink roller and then take your fish, put it on the ink, and then you stamp on paper. After that you can take a liner or black pen to add small details to the fish.”

By Dima 3CB

“This is Buchae from Korea. It is used for traditional dance in Korea. It is a really famous dance in Korea. I was inspired to create it because it is so beautiful. First I used stiff paper. Then I painted it. I painted white feathers with pink paint and stuck them to the fan. It painted really well. It was challenging to paint the fan because I first painted the roses, and the leaves and then I made the background, so I had to paint the leaves again”.

By Liza 3CK

Third Grade students have been involved in a Transdisciplinary Unit: How We Express Ourselves. This means that both in their classroom Unit of Inquiry, and in art, we address the same Central Idea :Through examining the arts, people can gain insights into culture”, while keeping in mind, the Key and Related Concepts of Perspective, Connection and Communication. In art, we have addressed questions such as “How is art an expression of culture? What is symbolism? How can art communicate personal stories, values and beliefs?”

This unit provides us the perfect opportunity to address both the ‘Creating, and Responding” Standards, from the National Core Art Curriculum Standards. Students are required to speculate about processes an artist uses to create a work of art, determine messages communicated by an image, and interpret art by analysing use of media to create subject matter.

Our most important objective, is that we are able to maintain opportunity for student agency and choice, as a means of ensuring optimal engagement for all.

In art class, the unit was launched before December break. Students were introduced to art works and designs found in Australian Aboriginal Dot Paintings, New Zealand Maori tattoos, wood carvings and jewellery, Mexican Huichol Yarn Paintings and Ancient Egyptian Wall Paintings. As a whole class students analysed and critiqued examples of these, taking note of repeating shapes, patterns and imagery, and sought meaning. What could they tell us about the location of the artists? What do we already know about these locations, or people, or cultures? What could repeating motifs/symbols tell us about what is important to this culture – beliefs, values and lifestyles?

Students discovered these through observational drawing. Provided with many examples, students were offered choices to investigate those which appealed to them most, through a variety of drawing and painting tools.

During this investigational time, students identified the location of the peoples/cultures on the world map, listened to some stories, music, viewed some dance videos, and delved a little deeper into symbolism in Australian Aboriginal Dot Paintings, working on making connections with all of the above.

Our work before December break was a good introduction to how art can address the concepts of perspective, communication and connection. Meanwhile, in their home room class, students were beginning to identify a culture for their own personal study.

In their homeroom class, students learned to research a culture of interest to them. A summative task was set, for students to demonstrate their understanding of the Central Idea, through a presentation, which incorporated an example of one of the arts from the chosen culture. Students were allowed to choose visual, or a performing art (eg music, dance, drama).

Those who made a strong connection to a visual art, were provided up to three art classes to work on their art piece. Additional time was given, for students to use our ‘action station’ (art area outside the art room) at a time agreed with their home room teacher.

With this, students were able to demonstrate their ability to plan an art work, make decisions on materials and tools they need, set up, and be responsible for, their workspace, and independently manage their time.

It was fabulous to see so many Third Graders choosing visual art as their art form and independently taking responsibility for their own learning. We saw the creation of art works from a variety of cultures, in a wide range of media.

Herewith, a small gallery of some finished products, and a video of our awesome artists in action. Enjoy!

All Grades: Wonderful Original Works of Art: Happy New Year!

Welcome back to school and Happy New Year! We hope you had an enjoyable and restful holiday. For those who have not been able to visit school, and view our very large exhibition, both in the ES Lobby, and also upstairs, outside the Art Studio, we have a Youtube Video, which shares much of it. Just before the break, some classes had the opportunity to view all, and document their favorites on Seesaw.

For any new families, welcome! And please see below the video, the notice which was sent out in our ES Newsletter in December, which reviews the first semester of our Choice Based Art Program. Enjoy!

This Semester ES Art Students have been introduced to a different approach to art education. Choice Based Art and Teaching for Artistic Behaviours (TAB) places the student at the centre of everything, allowing for greater agency and personalised learning. Through a choice based approach, and continuing to apply the mantra “You are the artist, and this is your studio”, we believe all students will be more invested, engaged and inspired, as this will appeal even more so, to their natural curiosity and personal interests. Through allowing choice, and providing more of a ‘workshop’ environment, students can work at their own pace, and with increased independence, whilst still meeting curricular objectives. 
 
Throughout the year, we shall focus on the understanding, or Central Idea, that ‘Artists practise a series of behaviours, which lead them through a process, resulting in an art work which conveys personal meaning to them’. We will continue to ask ourselves “What do artists do?” and “Where do ideas come from?”
This semester, students have focused on developing their sense of ownership over their artistic experience and environment by practising exploration of materials and tools, organisation of workspace, and the generation of ideas.  Students are entirely responsible for thoughtfully planning for, and selecting materials and tools in order to initiate exploration/experimentation, observational and/or imaginative work. Emphasis is also placed on the documentation of achievements, via Seesaw. All pieces are kept, as they provide opportunity for reflection, and are valuable evidence of process.
 
As we work through the transition to a full choice based program, students are beginning to become familiar with the Studio Habits of Mind (http://www.pz.harvard.edu/projects/the-studio-thinking-project) which can be directly linked to the National Core Art Standards, PYP learning outcomes and Learner Profile. These are early days, and the depth of exposure and understanding, is dependent on individuals and Grade level. The Studio Habits of Mind can be found at the foot of this notice.
To end the Semester, students have been busy producing a W.O.W piece of art. Please view our ES bulletin boards which are currently being adorned with Wonderful Original Works of Art. A W.O.W art work is one which students have committed two to three lessons to, one which they have carefully thought through, planned, gathered feedback, perfected and persevered until the end. With such personal investment in these pieces, students are experiencing a sense of pride in their efforts and learning process. Please take time to enjoy our W.O.W Gallery and subscribe to the ES Art Blog in order to follow our journey through Choice Based Art, in the new year.
                                      Studio Habits of Mind & PYP Attributes
Develop Craft: Learning to use tools, materials, artistic conventions, and learning to care for tools, materials and space (PYP Caring and Knowledgeable)
Envision: Learning to picture mentally, what cannot be directly observed, and imagine possible next steps in making a piece (PYP Inquirer)
Express: Learning to create works that convey an idea, a feeling, or a personal meaning (PYP Communicator)
Stretch & Explore: Learning to reach beyond one’s capacities, to explore playfully without a preconceived plan, and to embrace the opportunity to learn from mistakes (PYP Risk Taker)
Observe: Learning to attend to visual contexts more closely than ordinary ‘looking’ requires, and thereby to see things that otherwise might not be seen (PYP Inquirer)
Reflect: Learning to think and talk with others about an aspect of one’s work or working process, and learning to judge one’s own work and working process, and the work of others (PYP Reflective)
Engage & Persist: Learning to embrace problems of relevance within the art world/or of personal importance, to develop focus conducive to working and persevering at tasks (PYP Open Minded)
Understand (Arts) Community: Learning to interact as an artist with other artists (i.e. in classrooms, in local arts organizations, and across the art field)
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